A Blueprint for Brands in a Post-COVID world

A Blueprint for Brands in a Post-COVID world

In an initiative spearheaded by Beyond Research, Italy, Green Light was part of a 17 country collaboration to produce a sophisticated analysis of human behaviour around response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Not only does this report include human insights, but it translates these into direction for brands into the future.

Why is the report relevant to you?

The report is the first global qualitative viewpoint of the COVID-19 pandemic.

It analyses human response to the virus according to the situation in 17 different countries, taking into consideration economic, socio-political and cultural factors. The output therefore includes nuanced local analysis as well as plenty of concrete market-specific insights.

The analysis identified five consumer archetypes – the Warrior, the Jester, the Innocent Victim, the Common Man and the Creator. Each of the Archetypes has a corresponding role for brands to meet their needs. Concrete examples from the countries and across industries are used to bring to life each possible brand role.

The report also highlights 7 key insights for brands to take into consideration as they move into the future.

The countries involved include:

  • UK
  • Australia
  • Italy
  • Arab Emirates
  • Argentina
  • Belgium
  • Brazil
  • China
  • France
  • Germany
  • India
  • Russia
  • Saudi Arabia
  • Singapore
  • Spain
  • Thailand
  • USA

CLICK HERE FOR REPORT OR WEBINAR

What can brands learn from South Africa during the pandemic?

What can brands learn from South Africa during the pandemic?

Community seems to be the buzz word now we are all confined to our homes for the foreseeable future, without our usual routine of commuting, picking up our coffee en route, catching up with friends and colleagues over a drink or dinner or going to the gym.  Communities seem to have risen to the challenge, with our regular shout out for key workers, neighbours running errands for those who can’t get out, people checking up on those who live alone.  It seems that when the chips are down, the power of relationships and neighbourhood takes on a new importance.

They’ve always known about this in South Africa, through their concept of “Ubuntu”. In a nutshell, it means: “I am, because we are…”  Steve Biko, political activist who died for his beliefs, wrote in 1970: “We believe that in the long run the special contribution to the world made by Africa will be in the field of human relationships…. The great gift still has to come from Africa… giving the world a more human face.”

What if the legacy of the pandemic that’s levelled us all, across the first and third worlds could be something like Ubuntu?  Brands have been talking about caring for consumers, communities and the environment for years and now it’s time to put their money where their mouth is.  Local businesses, perhaps lighter on their feet, have been quick to respond. My local deli has teamed up with the (now closed as not essential) bookshop to deliver not only a selection of cheese and charcuterie but also your next good read. Pret a Manger has closed its stores and is operating on a take- away basis only and offering free hot drinks and a 50% discount for NHS workers. Morrisons has introduced guarantees on sick pay for staff who are both ill and self-isolating; the retailer has also committed to pay small suppliers faster to relieve the pressure on SMEs; Cabify have been offering free rides to medical workers in Madrid; Louis Vuitton has repurposed its workshops in Paris to create not smart bags but alternative non-surgical masks. All great initiatives that consumers will remember.

What about brands that miss the mark? I’ll be removing my custom from the local shop that charged me 3 times the price for half a dozen eggs, when they’d been scarce for several weeks; there’s been a public outcry at Virgin Atlantic’s seemingly double standards, requiring their staff to take 2 months unpaid leave, against their self-styled mantra of the “fun, friendly, fabulous choice that made travel attainable for everyone”.  Blatant profiteering or looking uncaring will damage the health of a brand in the short and long term as consumers vote with their feet.

In the economic slump that is surely heading our way, it remains to be seen which brands will survive, and which will sink without trace. In collaboration with our partners Beyond Research in Milan, we’re putting together our views on the likely outcome across a number of countries, which will be available shortly.  If you’d like a copy, please get in touch: fjack@greenlightresearch.com  In the meantime, let’s remember the ideas that underpin Ubuntu: what do we have in common? How best can we work together to ensure everyone’s needs are met?

Forming, storming, norming, performing at HIGNFY

Forming, storming, norming, performing at HIGNFY

Green Light had a great night out recently, attending the filming of Have I Got News For You. With filming taking a lot longer than the half hour programme we watch on a weekend would suggest, it was interesting to note how much the HIGNFY panel, featuring Frankie Boyle (presenter) Paul Merton, Ian Hislop, Cariad Lloyd & Gyles Brandreth and the process that they went through over two and a half hours, followed Tuckman’s five stages of group development: forming, storming, norming, performing & finally mourning. Even more interesting was seeing how certain individuals displayed behaviours similar to the ones we see so often in the respondents coming along to our group discussions.

find out more

2016 Villain of the Year

2016 Villain of the Year

As 2016 comes to an end we choose our Villain of the Year. In a particularly crowded category there can be only one winner: train delays!

Group discussions depend on many things; well-organised product management, a clear briefing and fantastic recruitment amongst others. However, train delays can derail everything if consumers can’t get to the groups on time and this year has been particularly shocking. find out more

Music in advertising : have brands stopped listening to the Grapevine?

Music in advertising : have brands stopped listening to the Grapevine?

Music is a powerful communications tool, a universal language which transcends borders and cultural barriers, and this is increasingly important in the context of global brands and advertising.   Academic literature shows that the right song or soundtrack can increase attention, making an ad more likely to be noticed, viewed and understood. find out more

What happens when the music stops?

What happens when the music stops?

Having spent some time recently doing ethnographic interviews with consumers about high-end music systems, I started thinking about the major role that sound – and music in particular, plays in our lives, and how it may affect our perceptions of brands. find out more